Salutation

It was the first time I saw her speaking with someone. She was on the other side of the library hall with one of my friend. They shared a laughter as I approach there, and it appeared like they enjoyed their moment. I greeted my friend and said “Hi” to the Miss. I realized that I will get late to catch the bus so I gave a quick hug to my friend and said goodbye to the Miss. 🙂

The next day, I was sitting on a couch in the corridor, waiting for my next class. There she came, walking in my direction. Her class was next to my class, so she sits and waits. “Hi” I greeted her. She said nothing. :/ Maybe she didn’t hear it. I stood up and moved to my class as my professor entered the classroom. 🤓

I didn’t really know, “If she heard and ignored me, or didn’t she heard my salutation?” I asked myself. 🤔
The class got over. It was an interesting session, but I was very tired. Heading towards the bus station, I saw her walking to-and-fro the bus stop. “So she also takes the bus?” I asked myself. Maybe this time, she will hear my salutation. When I reached the bus stop, I said in a loud voice “Good Afternoon”. Now it was confirmed, I know she won’t reply. 😳

Two weeks later, I was in the Math center, helping junior students with their homework. She came, passed by, and sat down. Miss was really silent. I was able to notice she had a problem, she needed help, but she won’t call the Math tutor. Then she raises her hand and made a sign to call the tutor. Why can’t she just say “Excuse me, sir?” I asked myself. Here my friend came, she greeted me and I greet her back. 🙂

“Can you please help my friend?” my friend asks.
“Sure, I will.” I replied.
“Thanks, and please be patient with her; she is deaf.” 😐

Tweeting: @smileeplz
#MerryChristmas 🎋 #HappyNewYear ❤

A Indian Snack – Jhaal Muri/Bhel Puri

Welcome to India,

Here we are on the streets of Mumbai in search of a Indian snack, and also a type of Chaat. It’s called Bhelpuri, often identified with the beaches of Juhu in Mumbai.  It is made out of puffed rice, vegetables and a tangy sauce. The recipe has spread to most parts of India where it has been modified to suit local food availability.

The Kolkata Variant of Bhelpuri is called Jhaal Muri. Jhaal Muri (Spicy Puffed Rice) is Bengali cuisine, a dry variant of Bhelpuri and is consumed after garnishing with onions, coriander and lemon juice. I think you are feeling hungry now. 😀

A vendor sells Bhelpuri on the streets of Mumbai.

A vendor sells Bhelpuri on the streets of Mumbai.

Bhelpuri and Jhaal Muri belongs to the food family of chaats, which are salty and spicy snacks sold on carts throughout India. Bhelpuri has a typically Gujarati (Gujarat) balance of sweet, salty, tart and spicy flavors, with different textures as well, including crispy and crunchy from the puffed rice.

Street Food in Kolkata

Bhelpuri can be served in many ways, but it is usually served in a paper folded in the form of a cone and is consumed using a paper spoon or by the ‘papdi’ which is itself an edible component of the ‘Bhelpuri’. ❤

Jhaal Muri served in the paper fold in the form of a cone.

Bhelpuri served in the paper fold in the form of a cone.

Jhaal Muri/Bhelpuri can beat the packet of chips which you take for snacks costing nearly same or even less with vibrant taste.

People in UK can try to find ‘Everybody Love Loves the Jhal Muri Express’ ran by Angus Denoon. Angus is bringing the Kolkata street food to your door step. You can search him on twitter @jhalmuriexpress

Everybody Loves - Jhaal Muri Express by Angus Denoon

Everybody Loves – Jhaal Muri Express by Angus Denoon

Shanti Restaurant in Surrey is another place to visit to have some taste of Indian street food. The restaurant has some fabulous dishes in there menu with different style and taste.

Vikram Vij hospitality shining at Surrey's My Shanti Indian restaurant

Vikram Vij hospitality shining at Surrey’s My Shanti Indian Restaurant

People in United States, especially in NYC can reach out ‘Desi Galli’ in Lexington,NY. Desi Galli has many Indian street foods available under one roof. You can try ‘Kathi Rool’ one of the most yummy food on Indian streets. 🙂

So, plan out for your next weekend with your family and friends to get some taste of Indian street foods nearby you. Hope you Enjoy it 🙂

Namaste ❤

Festival of Lights – Diwali

Happy Diwali.. 🙂

Deepavali.. a Hindu Festival celebrated in autumn every year  with great enthusiasm and happiness in India. The festival spiritually signifies the victory of light over darkness, knowledge over ignorance, good over evil, and hope over despair.

Diwali is celebrated around the world, particularly in countries with significant populations of Hindu, Jain and Sikh origin. It is celebrated in almost all the Asian countries, parts of Arab’s, Australia, New Zealand and  also in some parts of Africa.

Satellite picture of India taken NASA satellite on a Diwali evening.

Satellite picture of India taken NASA satellite on a Diwali evening.

Its celebration include millions of lights shining on housetops, outside doors and windows, around temples and other buildings. In India, Diya( Oil Lamp) is decorated. Diya’s are available in nearby and are made up of clay. An Indian potter paints earthenware lamps ahead of Diwali.

A women painting the diya's.

A women painting the Diya’s.

A Diya placed in temples and used to bless worshipers is referred to as an Aarti. Diya’s adorn every corner of the house on this very auspicious day and add fervor to the festive spirit.Moreover, a Diya also symbolizes knowledge.

Diya or Deepak, an oil lamp usually made from clay, with a cotton wick dipped in ghee or vegetable oil.

Diya or Deepak on top of a rangoli, an oil lamp usually made from clay, with a cotton wick dipped in ghee or vegetable oil.

Rangoli, a folk art from India can be seen on every doorstep. Rangoli patterns are created on the floor in living rooms or courtyards using materials such as colored rice, dry flour, colored sand or flower petals.

Colored Rice for Rangoli making

Colored Sand for Rangoli making

The purpose of Rangoli is decoration, and it is thought to bring good luck. Girls, boys and women’s create Rangoli and other creative patterns on floors, near doors and walkways.

A Rangoli design with diya's on top.

A Rangoli design with diya’s on top.

Decorative materials and statue of Goddess Laxmi and Lord Ganesha are brought to home.

Decorative Materials and statue of deities.

Decorative Materials and statue of deities.

The statue are decorated by pushp(flowes) and wore cloths. Later in the evening, during the pooja (prayer ritual) performed to host, honor and worship one or more deities.

Marigold flowers sold for decorating house.

Marigold flowers sold for decorating house.

Pooja ki thali is used to do Pooja and Aarti.

A plate decorated with Diya's and Marigold Flowes for Aarti.

Puja ki Thali, a plate decorated with Diya’s and Marigold Flowes.

Statue’s of Lord Ganesha and modern day Diya’s.

Pookja Ki Thali

 

Diwali is one of the happiest of holidays in India, with significant preparations. People clean their homes and decorate them for the festivities. Diwali is one of the biggest shopping seasons in India; people buy new clothes for themselves and their families, gifts, appliances, kitchen utensils, small to big ticket items such as cars and gold jewelry. People also buy gifts for family members and friends which typically includes sweets, dry fruits and seasonal specialties depending on regional harvest and customs.

Special Sweets during Diwali.

Special Sweets during Diwali.

Girls and women go shopping. It is also the period when little kids hear ancient stories, legends, myths and battle between good and evil, light and darkness from their parents and elders.  Youth and grown ups graduate to helping with lighting and preparing for patakhe (fireworks).

Crackers are burn during  Diwali eve.

Crackers are burn during Diwali eve.

Happiness is in the air, it’s Diwali everywhere, let’s show some love and care.

Wish you all a Happy Diwali, Namaste. 🙂

“You can always make money, you can’t always make memories”

“Travel, go as many places as you can. You can always make money, you can’t always make memories.”

I agree with the picture. Nothing compares with the memories that we can make together with our family & friends. It is something that we can always look back and reminisce.

We all know that “Time is limited” and we need to make the most of it while we can.  While we have the means and energy to enjoy these travels.

Nowadays, the word “travel” means expense.
Well, when you look at it, it is really expense but for me it is an expense worth spending.  It will help build a lasting memory and money cannot buy the memories that can be created in any of these travels made with family. Wouldn’t it be nice to look at a picture 5 years from now where you have traveled with you friends and family and in this day the age of instagram you’d probably hash tagged it like this #iloveyoumom #foreverlove #happiness #memories.

Let’s do what we can while we are still young!
Enjoy creating memories! 🙂

“Life is about the Little Things Keeping You Happy”

Enjoy the little things, for one day you may look back and realize they were the big things..

I think it’s important to find the little things in everyday life that makes you happy. Throughout our days, we choose not to think about the unsolvable paradox that is life. Instead, we try to spend our time on this earth peacefully, enjoying as much of it as possible.

We distract ourselves with jobs, careers and television. We make goals for ourselves and indulge in simple pleasures.

We get preoccupied with all the monotonous work, believing that a lost job or breakup is the end of life as we know it. We spend our lives chasing ideas and pursuits of riches. But where does our real happiness come from?

I read somewhere that : The big things should keep you busy and the little things should keep you happy.

Your career, your goals, your work, your family — those are the big things. Laughing with your best friends, a great cup of coffee — those are the little things. The big things are important, but life wouldn’t be worth living without the small things.

It’s important to realize that big things are just that, things. Big things are factors that distract you, that take up your time and your attention.

The big things are paying your bills and renting your first apartment. They are working towards that promotion and finding that person to marry. While these should make you happy and productive, they aren’t the things that are important.

The little things are the ones you need to pay attention to. The little things are what’s going to save you when your career ends or your marriage comes crashing down.

The little things are sunrises and sunsets, a great day and watching a stranger help the homeless.

The little things are the balcony in your home or the fresh water in the refrigerator. It’s the walks through Central Park and the silence near that place, you love it so much. It’s the warm weather and the fall breezes.

We forget to pay attention to the little things and shift our focus to attaining the big things. We forget to look up at the buildings or at the people we love because we’re too focused on getting to those bigger things we find so important.

We forget to appreciate the music we’re listening to and the food we’re eating. We forget to notice the artwork around us and the people next to us.

The big things are important, of course. They give us reason and purpose. They drive our lives, keeping us busy and motivated through a seemingly purposeless world.

They should distract us from the monotony of life and instill a sense of drive. However, we should not become absorbed in the distraction. That’s all the big things are, distractions.

They aren’t the real reasons to live or the things that bring the most joy. The things that bring joy and true happiness are the things we don’t pay much regard to, and it’s time to start realizing that small things can make big differences.

Everyone is trying to accomplish something big, not realizing that life is made up of little things..